You are here

Sea Turtle Nest

Summer is one of the most exciting times for lovers of Florida wildlife, and Sanibel is one of the best places to find it. 

As the Gulf of Mexico gets warmer in the summertime, the chances of seeing dolphins and manatees in the open increase. ...

The J.N. “Ding” Darling National Wildlife Refuge is named after Jay Norwood Darling, a political cartoonist. Darling was instrumental in the effort to block the sale of the environmentally valuable land to the developers on Sanibel. At Darling’s urging, President Truman signed an executive order...

It’s that time of year again. Turtle nesting season.

This program was originally started by Caretta Research, Inc. and Charles Lebuff in the late 1950’s. This makes it one of the longest running monitoring programs in the country. The program was transferred to SCCF in...

The beaches of Sanibel are surrounded by warm Gulf waters, a perfect place for fishing. While the waters are filled all year with fish and wildlife, May and October are considered premium fishing months. This is when the water temperatures are more moderate compared to...

Each summer we have families flock to Sanibel Island so their kids can attend Sanibel Sea School’s summer camp programs. For those unaware, Sanibel Sea School is dedicated to teaching children and adults about marine ecosystems. They give students the opportunity to touch, feel and...

The otter is a member of the weasel family and is known for its playfulness. It will slide down a muddy embankment repeatedly or engage in other behaviors that can only be described as having fun.

The otter population is declining as a result of...

The Roseate Spoonbill is a large wading bird. It is commonly found in Southern Florida and can be seen on Sanibel year round. Typically the best time of year to see them in JN “Ding” Darling is in October and November, especially in the early...

No no-see-ums

This post will address a small but very big concern.

Those who travel to Sanibel have alluded to tiny biting flies that often live near water. They are so tiny, they are not generally visible and hence their appropriate name, no-see-ums. Much like the mosquito...

Pages